-We believe the whole fear-of-automation thing has been much overhyped, but for what it’s worth, the Hechinger Report provides a list of “Ten Jobs That Are Safe from Robots.” However, number one on the list is “Musicians,” and number two is “Art Therapists,” so this link may not provide the most practical tool for bulletproofing your career.

-Another benefit of low unemployment and the booming economy is that job seekers in their 50’s and 60’s have better odds of placement, according to Forbes. In fact, the 3.1% unemployment rate for ages 55+ is lower than the overall rate of 3.9%. Question: as some schools consider targeting older-adult students to offset dwindling, traditional enrollments, how can they compete with abundant job opportunities?

-Also in Forbes, contributor Ryan Craig wonders if we will soon see “The Theranos of Higher Education.” Craig sees parallels between the simple but extensive fraud perpetrated by the bio-testing company and the growing evidence of data misrepresentations committed by universities as they seek to game their rankings by U.S. News and others. Although schools often claim these errors were unintentional, one wag observed, “Funny how all the ‘errors’ in the data colleges submit to U.S. News help their rankings rather than hurt them.”

-An agreement between shared-workspace vendor WeWork and the attorney general of New York offers another instance of the general weakening of non-compete restrictions on employees.

-Not hot yet: We previously committed to monitor the progress of a proposed merger between New Jersey’s Rowan College and Cumberland County College. Judging by a recent Daily Journal report, the reactions seem to be calm so far: only about two dozen people attended the first of many planned public forums to discuss the matter. However, in spite of any best efforts by school leaders to walk their communities through a merger process, we won’t be surprised if some combination of alumni, students, or politicians make things contentious.

-Louisville’s Sullivan University, a for-profit institution offering business and vocational courses, has laid off workers and reduced tuition in response to an enrollment shortage, according to the Courier-Journal.

-Connecticut gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont seeks to expand the free state-school tuition program for veterans by also waiving their fees. These fees can be quite high: the average at the University of Connecticut is almost $2,900 annually. State budget officials estimate this would cost an additional $5 million per year, and Lamont has not said whether these costs would be allocated to the school systems or to the general state budget.

-In the race for U.S. Representative from the fifth district of Washington state, candidate Lisa Brown is being criticized for repeatedly voting as a state legislator to increase tuition at public schools–amounting to an 81% increase over several years, according to the Tri-City Herald.

-CNBC provides an interesting map which highlights the differences among states in student loan delinquency. Mississippi and West Virginia lead the nation in delinquency, with default rates of over 16%.

-Niche has analyzed its survey data to create a list of the “Most Conservative Colleges in America,” as measured by the self-described political leanings of students. Most of the top 25 such schools are Christian and/or in the south.