-I’ll take hopeless situations for $1,000, Alex. A silly new game show on TruTV features contestants who answer trivia questions to win relief from their student debt. Paid Off was created by host Michael Torpey, who explains in an interview with the BBC that he hopes the absurd competition will draw attention to a serious problem. “It’s an absolute crisis–45 million Americans with $1.5 million of student debt,” says Torpey.

-A thoughtful column in Times Higher Education questions the standard assumptions in the higher educaiton model (that students attend campus, pay the university, study full-time, and  study at only one place) and draws interesting comparisons to alternative models in entertainment and professional sports.

-Nobody likes a merger. It’s clear that many departments within colleges, and many colleges themselves, will need to merge with others as schools adjust to decreasing enrollments. However, we find it interesting (but not surprising) that such merger proposals are almost always met with resistance and fierce criticism from faculty, students, and others. As a recent example, consider the recent complaint about the (wonderfully phrased) “academic Frankensteining” of merging two colleges at Cornell University. That particular idea has been abandoned for now.

-And when mergers do happen, they may only provide short-term relief to financial crises. That’s what we’re learning now in Connecticut, where plans are underway to consolidate the state’s community colleges.

-We were privileged to interview Professor Waren Treadgold about his book The University We Need shortly before its release. Now that the book is available, media coverage has increased, with the book’s proposals receiving favorable reviews in the Wall Street Journal and elsewhere.

-The founder of a SalesForce partner company explains how higher ed institutions can leverage cloud technology to maintain connections with students after graduation and increase the value of alumni involvement. “The relationship between your institution and the student should not depreciate after the time he/she spends on your campus. It should continue into their adulthood,” says Tal Frankfurt.

-Although students and other GenZ’ers have a reputation for suffering financially when it comes to funding their studies, they may have an advantage in other areas of personal finance, according to Forbes. Stuart Sopp notes that GenZ’s acces to alternative payment systems and other apps makes youth less dependent on banks. He writes,”Traditional banking services don’t resonate with a mobile-first generation that is used to simple, on-demand services.”

-Where’s the cow-milking app? With respect to farming families, a study finds that there’s a big gap between family members’ expectations: older members (Boomers, Gen X, and Gen Y) expect the younger members (Gen Z) will take over the farm, but far fewer of the GenZ’ers actually plan to do so.